The Greater Manchester Dementia Research Centre: World Alzheimer’s Day 2021 | News and Events

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The Greater Manchester Dementia Research Centre: World Alzheimer’s Day 2021

World Alzheimer’s Day takes place on Tuesday 21 September this year and is part of World Alzheimer's Month. This year, the Alzheimer’s Society is sharing the importance of the power in knowledge.

 

Learn more about dementia

 

By learning more about dementia and understanding changes in memory and behaviour, you and your loved ones can feel empowered to reach out for the help and support you need.

 

This month, Alzheimer’s Society are encouraging everyone to know the signs and symptoms of dementia so they can get the right diagnosis and support as quickly as possible.

 

The Greater Manchester Dementia Research Centre

 

In recognition of World Alzheimer’s Day, we would like to shine a spotlight on our Greater Manchester Dementia Research Centre (GMDRC) and the research work that the GMDRC is doing to try and stop this relentless illness.

 

Dementia is an umbrella term used to describe progressive worsening of thinking and memory, which makes people’s daily lives more difficult and potentially threatens their independence.

 

Alzheimer’s is a disease and the most common cause of dementia. Some other common types of dementia include vascular dementia and dementia with Lewy bodies.[1]

 

Dementia has become the leading cause of death in the UK, and in the year before the pandemic, more than 66,000 people died of dementia or Alzheimer’s disease. During the COVID-19 pandemic, the leading comorbidity amongst those who died from COVID-19 was dementia. [2]

 

Alzheimer’s disease causes 60% of all dementia, and Greater Manchester Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust (GMMH) is committed to offering our service users the opportunity to participate in life-changing research, with the hope of slowing, and perhaps stopping, this illness by hosting the Greater Manchester Dementia Research Centre.

 

Currently, the centre is involved in 10 different studies on Alzheimer’s and other dementias.

 

The GMDRC was also previously involved in the ground-breaking research that led to the June 2021 licensing of Aducanumab, an antibody against one of the proteins involved in Alzheimer’s, by the Federal Drug Administration (FDA) in America. This was the first new drug licensed for Alzheimer’s disease for over 20 years. Read more about the findings of this study here.

 

We are currently working with Industry and University partners to bring cutting-edge clinical trials and other studies to Greater Manchester. This includes ongoing studies of new oral therapies, intravenous medications, studies focused on diagnosis and prevention of dementia, and treatment of the earliest stages of the underlying diseases. We find that patients in research generally do better and research active Trusts have better patient outcomes.

 

Research is a pillar of our NHS and every single person we see has the right to participate in studies. It is only by encouraging patient participation that we can defeat illnesses like Alzheimer’s and give older people longer, and healthier lives.

 

For more information about the Greater Manchester Dementia Research Centre, please visit our webpage here: Greater Manchester Dementia Research Centre | Greater Manchester Mental Health NHS FT (gmmh.nhs.uk)

 

Why volunteer for dementia research?

 

Dementia currently affects more than 850,000 people in the UK.

 

Research offers hope. Only through research can we understand what causes dementia diseases, develop effective treatments and improve the care of those living with dementia.

 

But for research to make progress we need more people with and without dementia to take part in vital studies. Help beat dementia by signing up to Join Dementia Research today

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